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Cedar Walk Family and Cosmetic Dentistry Blog

How to Look After Your Children's Teeth

The importance of children’s teeth cannot be understated. Establishing a good oral health routine sooner rather than later can not only make them less likely to fall into bad habits in the future but it can be a huge benefit for their general health and well-being also.

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Topics: Pediatric Dentistry, General Dentistry, Oral Health & Hygiene

Teens

Your smile is one of the first things people notice about you. That’s why it’s so important to take care of it. Cavities aren’t just for little kids—you can get them at any age. When you consume sugary foods, soda, juice or energy drinks, you put yourself at risk for tooth decay and gum disease. Be smart. Always brush your teeth twice a day for two minutes and floss once a day.

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Topics: Pediatric Dentistry

Toothbrushes

The toothbrush has been around for nearly 5,000 years. “Chew sticks,” bone, wood, ivory and hog bristles all make up the far-reaching history of this instrument of oral health. The nylon bristled toothbrush that we now use was invented in 1938. Today, battery powered toothbrushes are available in addition to manual toothbrushes.

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Topics: Pediatric Dentistry, General Dentistry, Oral Health & Hygiene

Fluoridation

Community water fluoridation is a safe and effective way to prevent tooth decay. For nearly 70 years, community water fluoridation has played a major role in improving the public’s oral health. Because it helps prevent tooth decay in children and adults, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has proclaimed community water fluoridation as one of 10 great public health achievements of the 20th century. Today, studies prove water fluoridation continues to be effective in reducing dental decay by at least 25 percent in children and adults, even in the of era widespread availability of fluoride from other sources, such as fluoride toothpaste.

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Topics: Pediatric Dentistry, General Dentistry

Tips for a MouthHealthy Halloween

Halloween is around the corner, which for most children means bags of free candy and a chance to build a stockpile of sweets for the winter. No surprise, Halloween can also present parents with a variety of health and safety challenges.

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Topics: Pediatric Dentistry, General Dentistry, Oral Health & Hygiene

Thumbsucking

Thumbsucking is a natural reflex for children. Sucking on thumbs, fingers, pacifiers or other objects may make babies feel secure and happy and help them learn about their world. Young children may also suck to soothe themselves and help them fall asleep.

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Topics: Pediatric Dentistry

Babies and Kids - Healthy Dental Habits

Your child’s baby teeth are at risk for decay as soon as they first appear—which is typically around age 6 months. Tooth decay in infants and toddlers is often referred to as Baby Bottle Tooth Decay. It most often occurs in the upper front teeth, but other teeth may also be affected. In some cases, infants and toddlers experience decay so severe that their teeth cannot be saved and need to be removed.

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Topics: Pediatric Dentistry

Top 9 Foods That Damage Your Teeth

What you eat matters While hard candies seem harmless, eat too many and the constant exposure to sugar can be harmful to your teeth. Hard candies also put your teeth at risk because in addition to being full of sugar, they can also trigger a dental emergency such as a broken or chipped tooth. Better alternative? Chew sugarless gum that carries the ADA Seal.

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Topics: Pediatric Dentistry, General Dentistry, Holistic Dentistry, Oral Health & Hygiene

Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

Even though they are temporary, your child's baby teeth are important, and are still susceptible to cavities. Tooth decay in infants and toddlers is often referred to as Baby Bottle Tooth Decay, or Early Childhood Caries. Children need strong, healthy teeth to chew their food, speak and have a good-looking smile. Their first teeth also help make sure their adult teeth come in correctly. It’s important to start infants off with good oral care to help protect their teeth for decades to come.

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Topics: Pediatric Dentistry

Eating Healthy Can Help Your Baby Develop Strong Teeth

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Topics: Pediatric Dentistry, General Dentistry